Artist’s Statement

My paintings are inspired by the natural world, a fusion of scenes both remembered and imagined. From the simplicity of a single wildflower to the complexity of the deep sea, I aim to give fresh insights and perspectives to my subjects. I am outside, observing, as much as possible, and study field guides and natural history books to learn more about what I see. Edges interest me--from shore to sea, meadow to mountain, reality to abstraction. Tides change, the sun sets, borders blur.  

Influenced by the abstract gestural painters, such as Helen Frankenthaler, and color field artists, such as Mark Rothko, most of my work meanders along the border that separates abstraction and realism. I want to give the viewer something to hold onto (a hill, a pond, a wave) but then take them beyond that object into something deeper. I am painting a visual image, but also trying to convey a sense of the scene, a feeling, to tap into the viewer's memories and longings. 

I work with oil paints because I like their slowness and beauty, their smell, their history. I blend them with a mixture of beeswax, linseed oil and damar resin, to add depth and luminosity.

I paint scenes that have been painted many times before--the sea, a rose, rolling hills, and add something new, unexpected, fresh. My paintings feel alive as I work on them, and I want the viewer to pause and feel that vitality.

Biography

I studied art at Mills College in Oakland, California under Ralph Ducasse and Ron Nagle, among others. I painted sporadically in the years to follow, and spent many hours in museums, as I raised my family and worked as a public service lawyer. Several years ago I started painting steadily, and continued my studies at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum, with Christie Scheele, Joerg Dressler and Mary Giammarino . My paintings can be seen in the Longyear Gallery in Margaretville New York, or by arrangement in my studio in Lowell, Massachusetts..